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Crooks, torturers and God’s Own country

THE terrorist attacks in the United States on September 11, 2001 (9/11) in which nearly 3,000 people were killed, was a nightmare for humanity. But while people mourned across the globe, some schemed to make fortunes out of it even if it meant sending more innocent people to untimely graves. This is the case against two American psychologists; James Elmer Mitchel, 64, with a 1986 doctorate from the University of South Florida, and ‘Bruce’ Jessen who are accused of running a “Joint criminal enterprise”. Three of their victims have returned to hunt them in the courts.

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Our sister called Moses

OUR sister, Araminta Ross who became famous as Harriet Tubman, was born a slave in Maryland, United States (US) in 1820. She lived the American nightmare but decided at 29 to change her life of programmed servitude to that of a free person to whom hundreds of slaves directly, owed their freedom.

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Like Obama, Odia Ofeimun turns to politics

BARACK Obama was a phenomenon when he turned to politics. His Presidential victory seemed assured that July 24, 2008 day he stood in a street to address over 200,000 Germans in Berlin, in the “Victory Column Speech”. It was a trip to Europe to test if the young Democrat had the presidential stuff to lead the world. He electrified the audience painting a picture of a new world, a new partnership and a new direction towards peace. He displayed the rarity of a genius.

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A walk with Aregbesola in Osun

OLD friends, like old wine, are usually better than new ones. The Governor of the State of Osun, Ogbeni Rauf Adesoji Aregbesola is an old friend. The state he governs, like most in the country, has been financially challenged to the extent that it took a bail out from the Federal Government to pay salaries. Although almost all states in the country lie financially prostrate like Osun, Aregbesola, perhaps for his vibrancy, oratory and radical views has received the most bashing.

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The struggle for Brazil

THERE is an on-going struggle for the soul of Brazil, the world’s fifth largest country which has become a model of how to rescue millions from abject poverty. The battles may well turn bloody because it is not strictly a fight over constitutionalism, corruption or the economy; it is primarily, a struggle of the social classes.

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Women as expendables

AS is usually the case with teenagers leaving home for the first time, when I went to the university, I was adventurous. During my first semester holidays, rather than go home in Lagos, I went with my new found friend, Edmond Enaibe whose home was in Port Harcourt. From Port, I travelled to my ancestral home, Patani to see my maternal grandmother. There was no East-West Road in those days, and a journey from Port Harcourt included going by road, crossing a river by boat, and completing the journey through bush paths by motorcycle.

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