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We can’t shut our eyes to injustice

OUR country is a secular state, but the Nigerian spirit teaches us to stand up for justice, defend the weak, the repressed and the oppressed. Nigerians are so fair-minded that even in football, if our national team is not playing well, we sometimes switch support to the visiting team. We are also quite religious; the Holy Books teach us to be our brother’s keeper.

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EU-UK dilemma, but Africa’s worse off

BRITISH Prime Minister, David William Donald Cameron, 49, bounced around Friday, February 19, 2016 like a Caesar who had just won a decisive battle. After two days of grueling talks with his European brothers and sisters during which he was reported to have had only three hours sleep, he snatched an agreement giving the United Kingdom special status in the European Union (EU)

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Mathematical politicians

MANY mathematical problems still elude solution. So, huge rewards are offered for any one that can resolve problems in such fields as partial differential equations, algebra, analysis or combinatorics. The contribution of Nigerian politicians is not to prove the truth or falsity of any mathematical problem, like the unsolved 116-year old Hilbert’s Problems which include algebraic curves, but to add their own mathematical problems.

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Laurent Gbagbo: Guilty as charged 

IMMEDIATE past president of Cote d’ Ivoire, Laurent Gbagbo was on January 28, 2016 hurled before the International Criminal Court (ICC) in the Hague charged with crimes against humanity. He had already spent five years in jail awaiting trial by a court that ordinarily has no jurisdiction to try him as the ICC is not the court of first instance. The ICC is a court of last resort trying only cases national authorities cannot or will not prosecute. This is not the case with Gbagbo whose wife, Simone has already been tossed into a 20-year jail, and son, Michel, to five years imprisonment. If Ivorian courts could try and sentence the Gbagbo family, they can try him also.

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Beko: Ten years like yesterday

BEKO Ransome-Kuti was the unarmed general of the people who led them in countless campaigns against the perpetuation of military rule and for the enthronement of democracy. In the course of those struggles, he was dragged from his office or the streets and detained, several times. Imprisoned in the Kirikiri Maximum Prison, charged to court countless times, and when he remained unbowed, the Abacha regime decided on a final solution; his elimination. So he was charged with coup plotting; he did not get the death penalty but was awarded life imprisonment. He survived the harshness of the Kaduna Prison.

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AU: Too feeble to decide or stand

THE African Union (AU) 26th Session which closed in Addis Ababa on January 31, held a lot of promise for a continent brought to its knees by insecurity and violence; some of it self-inflicted. The expectations were high and the organisation’s leaders were on point in their opening speeches. Dr. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, the Chair of the African Union Commission which runs the Secretariat, told the world that Africa is committed to “silencing the guns”. Explaining why the theme of the Session was “African Year of Human Rights with particular focus on the Rights of Women”, Zuma declared that the continent has refused to be indifferent to violent extremism, gender-based abuses and suffering due to conflicts.

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Nigerians contented with little

I AM not a fan of Kaduna State Executive Governor, Nasir El-Rufai. I find him rather brash. Even with some of my friends serving in his government, I did not think highly of administration. Then last week, I got a call from a close friend. He said his extended family in Kaduna who run a private school is thinking of phasing out conventional education and taking a different course. The reason is that most of its students have moved en-mass to public schools. But he says his family school is not the only private one limping; a number of others are tottering at the point of collapse for the same reason.

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