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Who governs Nigeria?

He reminds us why Nigeria has no reason to celebrate a 50th Independence celebration. That Nigeria is, afterall, still not free. That its political freedom is an illusion created to deceive, and that its lack of political freedom is the cause of its terrible underdevelopment, which demands from us to raise this question: “who governs Nigeria?” and that the answer to this question should naturally compel Nigerians to begin the second phase of the anticolonial nationalist movement. We have wasted half a century.

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A house of cads

The legislature is the weakest link in Nigeria’s current democratic experiment. Its weakness derives in part from the many years of military rule which disorganized the rules of conduct as well as the values of debate necessary for a robust parliamentary culture.

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Governing the East

Eastern Nigeria is endowed greatly with human and material resources. The energy and dynamism of its population could propel it, given right conditions, to tremendous economic and social growth that could rival India, China, Brazil, and have implications for the Central West African corridor, right down to the Congo.

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Governing the East

Eastern Nigeria is endowed greatly with human and material resources. The energy and dynamism of its population could propel it, given right conditions, to tremendous economic and social growth that could rival India, China, Brazil, and have implications for the Central West African corridor, right down to the Congo.

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In the name of the University

There are assessment and evaluation issues at stake. But of great concern to me is the relationship between universities and the production of the labour force. Why private universities? What is the great need? Nigerian universities produce a great number of graduates annually who are mostly unemployed. Private universities simply max out Nigeria’s unemployment statistics by churning out more into the labour market.

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Probe Obasanjo too

Mr. Bello Adoke had challenged a pressure group of transparency and anti-corruption advocates who are pushing for the prosecution of former military president, Ibrahim Badamasi Babangida over allegations of corrupt handling of the said $12.4 oil windfall. Last week, the Attorney-General pledged, in a letter to the group that he would set up a committee to ascertain the veracity of the report, review the allegation, and if there’s any meat in it possibly commence a criminal charge of the former military dictator.

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Police reform should be at the top of Jonathan’s agenda

Last year in Burlington, Vermont, I met a young Nigerian woman studying at Princeton who once loved visiting her ancestral home in Owerrinta, but who told me, “I’m not likely to visit again and that makes me sad.” Her parents will not permit her from all the news about kidnappings that they have heard from reports both in the media and by friends of theirs.

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The stars have departed

He enjoyed a rich professional life, rising to Director of Public Works and Permanent Secretary in the old Western Nigerian government. He left his civil service position in 1966 as permanent secretary and embarked on the academic life, joining the Engineering department of the University of Lagos where he also enjoyed a fruitful career.

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Culture and its discontents

In the pit of Nigerian politics lies the soul of philistines. A nation cursed with a political leadership without the subtle refinements of culture is doomed to crassness. We see this truth as a matter of fact, reflected in the utter disregard to which the political establishment places culture and matters of cultural policy.

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Ash over Europe

I traveled from St. Louis, to Detroit, to Amsterdam the previous Wednesday on my way to Liverpool. I did not arrive Liverpool. The Delta/KLM flight just managed to complete the first leg of the journey. I arrived at the Schipol Airport in Amsterdam on Thursday morning preparatory to taking the morning hop to Liverpool.

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A view from the Igbo Studies conference in Washington DC

The remarkable ways by which that contact has shaped the Igbo continues to be the basis of reflections by scholars – and increasingly by Igbo scholars who feel the powerful “urgency of now” to call attention to the intricate as well as intriguing situation of the contemporary Igbo of modern Nigeria, in its current relationship with nation and with the emergent world.

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A letter to Goodluck Jonathan

Dear Dr. Jonathan. I greet you in the name of the Republic. I hope we still have a republic to speak of, seeing that over the years, the foundational republican idea on which this nation was negotiated and founded in the various rounds of constitutional conferences leading to independence has been fundamentally eroded.

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Stanley Macebuh(1942-2010)

Far more incisive things have been said by those who knew Dr. Stanley N. Macebuh far more closely than I. I should in fact rather say that I did not work with Dr. Macebuh; I came into journalism at the moment of his dramatic ouster. I met only his tails at the door. By the time I arrived the Guardian as a cub, a sea-change had occurred; Macebuh and the great denizens with whom he made the paper tick had exited.

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