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Candid Notes

@war 50 years after the war

TOMORROW marks the 50th anniversary of the end of the Nigerian civil war (1967-1970) but we have remained locked in low-intensity warfare ever since because we are a senseless country. Our last civil war broke out over unresolved nationality question and its most unfortunate that our fault lines are more pronounced in January 2020 than they were in July 1967 when we started killing ourselves like the “enemy tribes” Lord Lugard once called us.

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Momoh, Minimum wage, Nigeria

To save Nigeria: Let’s talk

ELDER statesman, one- time Information Minister, former Chairman of the Congress for Progressive Change, CPC and a leading member of the All Progressives Congress, APC and one of the greatest Nigerian journalism ever produced, Prince Tony Momoh, has just just come out with a reprint of his patriotic memorandum to the 2005 National Conference tilted: “To Save Nigeria: Let’s talk”.

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Nigeria is losing a whole generation to unemployment

Deconstructing agitations for Development Commissions

I RECALL a phone call I had with elder statesman and South-South leader, Chief E.K Clark in 2009 when then President Umaru Yar’Adua mooted the idea of a Niger Delta Ministry when agitations from the oil-producing zone reached its crescendo. I did say that Niger Delta should not think that a ministry would address its concerns as the Ministry of Education has not given us education and that we lack electricity despite the Ministry of Power.

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Nigeria is losing a whole generation to unemployment

Ogomudia prophecy

IN a season when Nigerian seers and prophets are either not hearing from God or are afraid of maximum rule to declare “thus sayeth the Lord” over the country, the spirit of prophecy came over Alexander the son of Ogomudia who made undiluted pronouncement over a country driving carelessly to the edge of the precipice on the first day of December.

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Who still reads? Asks Prof J.P. Clark

WHAT appears to be an obituary of literate Nigeria was pronounced on Saturday when one of the greatest men of letters Nigeria ever produced, Prof. J.P. Clark, asked a pregnant question. It was over lunch at the country home of his elder brother, Chief E.K Clark in Kiagbodo, Delta State shortly after the end of the maiden convocation of Edwin Clark University, ECU.

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Professors of shame

GREAT artists sometimes get prophetic and often more accurate than some professional prophets who engage in guesswork to remain relevant or bind their flocks. Upon reading an advance copy of Chinua Achebe’s novel, A Man of The People, Achebe’s friend, Nigerian poet and playwright, John Pepper Clark, declared: “Chinua, I  know you are a prophet. Everything in this book has happened except a military coup!” Nine days after the novel was published the first coup in Nigeria took place. Were it under the fertile minds of Nigerian crude order, the novelist would have been arrested for being accessory before the fact of the military interregnum.

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