Breaking News
Translate

Critical thinking, a means to defeat the untouchables

IT defies the laws of history and karma to believe that evil can go on unchecked forever. Incidentally, this is typical Nigerian thinking: the privileged and politically connected in this country would have us believe that for all eternity, the same set of corrupt, selfish individuals will have their way, living large at the expense of the majority. I have bad news for them: things are about to change.

Read More

Change and theories of development

Out with the old, in with the new. If only it were that simple. In the field of political science, various theories and methodologies exist to advise government, thought leaders and the private sector on strategic planning; that is, how to bring about change or modernisation in any organisation. The theory of change, in particular, promotes social change by defining long term goals mapped backwards in order to identify the pre-existing conditions which enable the said change.

Read More

Remaining awake through a great revolution

I often feel as if we, in Nigeria, are stuck in a debtor’s prison. Before many of us are even born, to a certain extent, we owe debts which we must repay. Our very lives and livelihoods we often owe to other people who have the unequivocal power to decide, much like gods, who will be allowed to go further, who will prosper and who won’t based on arbitrary rules. This all begins because individualism is not acceptable in the Nigerian society.

Read More

Nigeria: Blackmailers beware or beware of blackmailers?

HOW did we get here? How is it that a country like Nigeria borrows not to fund infrastructure and lift its people out of extreme poverty but to pay salaries and fund its recurrent expenditure? Quite honestly, I am not surprised that national debt now stands at 63 billion dollars. We are a country of showmen who would rather spend on frivolities than on anything of substance with long lasting effects on our lives.

Read More

The Progressive agenda: Citizenship and combatting inequality

THE Mayor of New York City, Bill de Blasio, recently unveiled a policy document: “the progressive agenda to combat income inequality”, a sort of road map to “make sure the voice of every American is heard­­—not just those at the very top” and to “uplift working people and help working parents, and champion a tax system that rewards work instead of just wealth”.

Read More

UK general election: Regional and popular interests in Nigerian and UK politics

By Tabia Princwill EVERY time Nigeria’s size or ethno-religious diversity are used as excuses to explain our country’s lack of development, I am forced to argue that many other countries across the globe have experienced these same challenge laced opportunities and yet, have not continuously sacrificed the common good on the altar of political greed.
Read More

Political appointments and the good of the state

The hustle for position and appointments is a defining factor of Nigerian life. The joke now, in most parts, is to ask friends if they are moving to Abuja which goes to show that although a majority of Nigerians voted for “change” in principle, few truly understand what it entails. Unlike more developed countries where those called to serve often have solid educational backgrounds in policy making, those attempting in Nigeria to gain appointments often have no real understanding of governance and policy. Instead, what is touted as “experience” is simply experience in deal making and speaking the language Nigerian politicians understand: money.

Read More

Nation building and popular culture: Economic incentives to create the new Nigeria

DURING French philosopher and writer, Ernest Renan’s famous 1887 lecture at the Sorbonne, my Alma matter, he asked the question “what is a nation”? He answered, “a soul”, a “spiritual principle”. What is the “essence” of Nigeria? What are our common beliefs, principles? Unfortunately, the answer to that veers towards the negative.

Read More