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The Nigeria Police: A post-mortem organisation?

In 2001, while travelling to Atlanta, USA, to attend the annual CNN world news report conference, I changed flights at Gatwick Airport, London. While there, one British ‘area boy’ snatched my brief case and ran into thin air. With confidence, I went to the police desk at the airport to make a complaint. The officer there virtually ignored me after murmuring something like “the public announcement you have been hearing repeatedly that everyone should hold on tightly to his luggage is not for fun.”

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Nigerian judges are not ghosts: They live among us

The appointment of Joshua- my childhood friend and classmate-to the position of high court judge several years ago presented an interesting experience that has refused to elude me. On the day the appointment was made, we — all his friends— trooped to his residence in celebration to congratulate him. He was, in fact, the first to be so honoured among us. But, then, although everyone of us looked happy over the development, the environment was rather too serene for a supposedly joyous occasion.

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Judicial circumlocution in Nigeria

From media reports, it would appear that the National Judicial Council (NJC) has finally arrived at a verdict on the legal battle between Justice Isa Ayo Salami, President of the Court of Appeal (PCA) and Justice Aloysius Katsina- Alu, Chief Justice of Nigeria (CJN). To be frank, the verdict took us by surprise considering the obvious design to delay it as is customary with cases in our courts.

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For states like Nasarawa, its now or never

Today, we remember with delight the then Brigadier Samuel Ogbemudia, erstwhile Military Governor of the old Midwest region who transformed the region beyond imagination. He built the University of Benin and its Teaching Hospital; established Midwest Television now NTA Benin; set up the Nigerian Observer; built the State Secretariat and the High Court complexes as well as the Stadium which became famous for an annual international tennis championship-the Ogbe Hard Court.

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How to become a Federal Minister

Professor Grace Alele-Williams is ever positively in our thoughts not only for her invaluable services to the University of Benin as Vice-Chancellor but also for her series of publications many years earlier, on ‘Mathematics Made Easy’. The publications we must confess rescued many of us from the burden of poor performance in examinations which in our days had mathematics as a compulsory subject.

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Ministerial competence

During Nigeria’s second republic, certain ministers and a few other political office-holders who paraded the corridors of power as close associates of the President were loathed nationwide for their perceived roles in the conduct of government business. There was the generally-held opinion that such persons and not President Shehu Shagari were responsible for whatever went wrong with the nation’s governance.

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How do EFCC cells look like?

When I first heard the news of the arrest of Dimeji Bankole, immediate past speaker of the House of Representatives, by the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission (EFCC), I had the feeling that it was only for a chat that would last some minutes. My mind went back to 1993 when as Director of Public Affairs at the defunct National Electoral Commission; I was invited for a chat by the State Security Service (SSS) in the heat of the controversial June 12 Presidential election.

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House of Assembly members-Touts or comedians?

An ardent follower of activities of the legislature at State level in Nigeria would not find it difficult to establish the true character of its members. Events since the return of democracy in 1999 have shown that a typical member of a State House of Assembly operates essentially as a dubious person. In this article, we shall concentrate on three areas. The first is the legislator as a Tout.

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Corruption in the Nigerian media

A fortnight ago, one of my previously cherished neighbours, Professor Sam Ajayi, a pharmacist, shouted across the fence to salute me, but his rather good gesture ended in a fiasco as we both swore never to relate again. The bone of contention was his caustic remarks about some of my colleagues in the media whom he claims visit his Agency regularly to “beg him for money”.

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