Breaking News
Translate

Nigeria, oh Nigeria! (2)

The problems of Nigeria are too serious to be treated cavalierly at this point in time. Therefore, instead of wasting energy and scarce resources celebrating a cretinous giant, Nigerians, especially top members of the ruling class and the bourgeoisie, ought to have spent the day meditating on the problems of the country and how to go about resolving them with renewed vigour, commitment, courage and selflessness. This year’s independence anniversary has come and gone.

Read More

Who shall be our next President? (2)

Obviously that is a limitation, but we are not totally helpless as a result. Media practitioners over the years have improved their information-gathering and investigative capabilities using available technology, to the extent that one can have enough reliable information about prominent individuals (without necessarily meeting them face-to-face) which otherwise would not have been possible.

Read More

The case for benevolent dictatorship in Nigeria(3)

We are not claiming that all the actions taken by Yew and Rawlings are flawless or that after their transformatory exploits all Singaporeans and Ghanaians respectively have been “living happily ever after.” Both countries are still grappling with the usual problems of nation-building, including the perennial issues of poverty and equitable distribution of wealth among the citizens.

Read More

The case for benevolent dictatorship in Nigeria(2)

Yet, that does not mean that all socio-political revolutions are useless or that reform is always the best option. In a decadent country like Nigeria, if members of the ruling elite are impervious to the yearnings and aspirations of the people and continue to behave as if the entire country belongs to them, the case for radical change becomes more compelling. Now, has the ruling elite in Nigeria been sensitive and responsive to the welfare of Nigerians?

Read More

The case for benevolent dictatorship in Nigeria(1)

As Nigeria moves closer and closer to the 2011 elections, politicians and other stakeholders in the political process have started strategising for the event. Attahiru Jega, a well-known academic who made a name for himself by leading the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) through a successful nationwide strike during the regime of Ibrahim Babangida, is now chairman of the Independent National Electoral Commission (INEC).

Read More

South Africa 2010, Vuvuzelas and Octopus Paul

Now, although Bafana Bafana was eliminated in the group stage, the team was not disgraced: at least, it defeated a former world champion – France. Ghana too tried, but Asamoah Gyan’s costly mistake of missing a penalty kick robbed his country the honour of being the first African nation to reach the semi-finals of the World Cup. Nigeria’s participation was a complete disaster.

Read More

Unwise Daniels have come to judgment (1)

Several notable jurists and lawyers have spoken loud and clear about the virus of corruption spreading like HIV among judicial officers. For example, Kayode Eso, formerly of the Supreme Court of Nigeria, has expressed frustration at the elephantine level of corruption by judicial officers, and the manner judges and lawyers of big men and thick madams abuse legal minutiae and technicalities to delay and subvert the course of justice.

Read More

Democracy as lootocracy: the Nigerian example (2)

Yet, our country has failed abysmally to live up to the lofty aspirations of the founding fathers of independent Nigeria. Our fundamental problem is the persistent phenomenon of agbata ekee leadership which has crippled everything. Corruption, ineptitude, hypocrisy, absence of accountability and transparency in governance, and lack of compassion for the less privileged etc have impeded the realisation of our developmental aspirations.

Read More