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I sold my only car to make an album – The Preacher

By Ebun Babalola

Godwin Esebamen a.k.a.Gee The Preacher is a gospel artiste whose genre of music is a fusion of r&b, rock, reggae and jazz.

A writer, composer, and a singer of thought-provoking songs, The preacher believes so much in charity hence his desire to be recognised as an ambassador of the United Nations for humanitarian services.

Gee an indigene of Esan Central, (Uromi) Local Government, Edo State is a holder of the Ordinary Diploma in Civil Engineering from the Yaba College of Technology,Lagos. He’s also the Chief Executive officer of Wrought Ornamental Plus, Limited, an interior consultative firm.

In this interview, he talks about his soon-to-be released album.

Excerpt

How many album have you released?

This is my debut album and it has 13 tracks.

How did you come into music?

I was born into a family that loves music. My late mum used to be the leader of a dance group. I developed interest in music while growing up in the children department of my Church, the Church of God Mission.

And from the children Choir, I joined the senior Choir in Faith Arena Christian Redeem Voices. So, it’s a passion I’ve been nurturing for more than twenty years.

Why did it take you this long to make your debut?

I believe my coming now out is timely and divine. I also believe God allowed it to happen now. I never anticipated releasing an album in my life.

Although I’m a composer and a songwriter, I’m also an instrumentalist.

But right now, I see the need to address some of our societal ills. It’s a pity that people are being forced to listen to unpleasant lyrics.

It was this premise that God gave me a vision to compose and release this album. And achieving it was tough, because I spent all my life savings on it.

Let’s know some of the songs in your album?

There is this song I titled “Urhuese”, (Thank You), it’s a fusion of rock and it’s a song of appreciation to God for turning my life around. I’ve lived my life as Orphan, but despite my predicament, I didn’t misbehave or join bad gangs.

There is also “Ose”, which is a fusion of Afro and highlife beats. The next song is “The love Cry”, a song dedicated to orphans and the physically challenged persons in our society.

What are some of the challenges you faced as an orphan?

With no one to run to, I was compelled to wait endlessly for help that had been dashed severally by evil forces.

I’m still believing in God to shoot at least a video for one of the songs in the album. I spent my entire life saving, sold my only car just to produce this album.

With so many gospel artistes in the country how would you cope with the competition?

I’m not an artist that sings gospel music for the fun of it. I’m a born again Christian, and I sing according to God’s direction. He needs to minister to me first before I can minister to the people. That is why I said that my songs are inspirational and thought provoking.

How do you get your inspiration?

I cannot remember the last time I sat down to write songs. I draw inspiration from the Bible or through meditation. And whenever the Holy Spirit ministers to me, I pick up my phone, voice the chorus and develop the song later.

Your songs seem to be targeted at the less-privileged people and the widows in society. Are you seeing this set of people as a selling point?

I’m not into music because of the material gains, I know that God will reward me. My music is like a ministry. People should be concerned with the legacy they would leave behind than setting financial goals as a priority. People should know that God put them in a particular position to meet other people’s needs.

Have you considered problems of inconsistency when it comes to content delivery?

Anyone who considers money as yardstick for whatever he or she is doing in life will definitely compromise.

There is always the danger of compromise and that is why they are faced with lots of challenges and inconsistency. It is possible for anyone who sings gospel songs to easily veer into circular music because the motive behind it is wrong.

I have a calling, and I believe that God will give me the inspiration whenever he wants to speak with his people.

Do you intend to do a collabo with other artistes?

Yes. I hope to work with Ade Bantu, Nneka and others

But these artistes are not gosple singers?

Gospel means good news. I’m bringing Ade Bantu, Nneka and other international artistes not because they are not gospel artistes but the fact that people should know that with circular artistes, it is possible to produce a thought-provoking gospel songs without compromise.

How do you intend to tackle the menace of piracy when your music finally hits the market?

Hold Nigerian musicians responsible for piracy in the country.

I learnt this in the course of producing this album. It’s like crying wolf. The same artistes lamenting the scrouge of piracy are the same people negotiating with the pirates. They will ask the pirates to put their songs in a mix tape, (tape compromising their songs and other artistes).

They are not worried about the monetary reward that the pirates would get but they are just looking for fame because the more their songs are being played the more they get publicity, prominent and invitation to perform. And the more money they get.

The truth is that these people pay for this particular job to be done. And if they want their songs to be selected amongst the contemporary artistes like Tuface or Dbanj, they would have to pay more. It’s absurd.


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