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Tip of a New Dawn

The superficiality of Nigerian artists, a betrayal of the Nigerian mind

Popular culture in Nigeria has ironically helped to enshrine many of our societal ills by converting them into norms and values. The lyrics of many artists today celebrate the “fast money lifestyle” which is symptomatic of a fundamentally corrupt society and glamourises disenfranchising behaviours which ordinarily, in other climes, social critics and the public themselves would have decried.

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Who came first, extremism or the gap between the rich and the poor?

Everything happening in the world right now pinpoints the many failures of capitalism. The white underclass, betrayed by an economic system which promised a trickle-down effect if trade managers were allowed to operate without much challenge to conglomerates’ bottom line, opted for a world of barriers and suspicion, one which rejects the “other”, the migrant and “job thief”.

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Religion will be Nigeria’s undoing

The practice of putting individuals before institutions is one of the many issues preventing Nigerians from benefiting from the justice, equality and fairness which their global counterparts take for granted. Instead, excuses, in Nigeria, are made to explain why certain rules don’t apply to certain people, or why “human rights”, genteel treatment apply only to the rich and not to the poo

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Who is afraid of Ibrahim Magu?

SEVERAL events occurred in recent times which only serve to highlight the peculiarities of the Nigerian system and the strange brand of politics we’ve embraced—change is proving rather difficult. The first and perhaps most notable of all the events was the Senate’s rejection of Ibrahim Magu, the acting Chairman of the Economic and Financial Crimes Commission, EFCC, who wasn’t confirmed to his position, due to a Department of State Security, DSS, “security report” which apparently, levels certain allegations against him, although little seems clear.

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We’re still not talking about poverty

When will we, the people, free ourselves from our Stockholm syndrome and stop celebrating our captors? With the intensity of the debates surrounding the economy (debate is a big word, all we’re really saying is that something needs to be done, very few solutions are ever truly proffered), it must be pointed out that yet again, we limit ourselves to surface issues and seemingly refuse to broaden the scope of our interrogations. I am not one of those who believes Buhari must stop blaming PDP or Jonathan for the mistakes made in

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Nigerians, happy, loyal, slaves

Quote is from a novella, Benito Cereno, by Herman Melville, an American novelist. It tells the story of a revolt aboard a Spanish slave ship. Its captain, Benito Cereno, is forced by his ex-captives to pretend that all is well on board when the vessel is discovered by Captain Delano after a storm. Delano wonders why Cereno and his crew, whom he has just rescued from potential shipwreck, act so awkwardly and nervously around the slaves who paradoxically show little or no respect for their authority.

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How lies become truth

Nigerians want to be lied to. We claim to seek the truth, to desire honesty from our leaders. Yet we’re all too comfortable with lies. It is our complacency, our acceptance of socio-economic backwardness as the norm which is the true cause of today’s recession. In a country where overnight oil millionaires influence public thinking and monopoly capitalism is the only unchanging policy, recession was almost inevitable, given our refusal to invest in anything else beyond rhetoric. We never imagined there could be an end to the quick and easily obtainable oil rents our entire society survives on.

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How America became a third world country

I still remember how every minority in the Western world seemed to walk taller, with more confidence, the day Barack Obama won the US Presidential election. I was living in France at the time, a country which is unfortunately no stranger to identity politics and resurgences of xenophobia, and I remember swaggering into my lecture hall. Black street cleaners had swagger; black workers had swagger

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Do Nigerians really want change?

The question must be asked, again and again. We are a people whose collective psyche has been battered by all manner of injustice. In a country where university graduates become house helps due to lack of jobs, in a hierarchal society where opportunity and progress seem almost impossible, unless one belongs to the right circles, the idea of change, of social justice, is obviously seductive. However, little in our actions enables “change” or pushes a progressive, equal opportunity stance.

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