slavery

Nigeria’s high debt: Invitation to recolonisation and slavery

Nigeria’s high debt: Invitation to recolonisation and slavery

By Aare Afe Babalola THE history of the African continent cannot be complete without reference to slave trade and in fact, during the trans-Saharan slave trade, African slaves were transported across the Sahara Desert to North Africa to be sold to the Mediterranean and Middle Eastern civilisations. Historically, slavery was practised in different forms – […]
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Akinwale: From courtroom to fighting modern slavery with painting

Akinwale: From courtroom to fighting modern slavery with painting

FOR ages, lawyers are reputed as agents of social change globally. This truism reflects in Ojo Akinwale, founder Kick Against Human Trafficking Foundation, who is combining his training as a lawyer and artist, to fight human trafficking. In his story, you are confronted with chilling tales of trafficked girls and even men. His passion for the cause is indeed, a statement that ending human trafficking is a task not just for the authorities but everyone. He is the Managing Partner, O J Akinwale and Partner.

Forced slavery and self imposed  slavery in Nigeria and beyond (2)

Forced slavery and self imposed slavery in Nigeria and beyond (2)

Last week I traced the origin of the slave trade and how slaves captured in Africa were transported to the New World in harrowing conditions which left millions dead. I detailed the efforts made to curb the trade and how within Africa itself there was some form of opposition to the eventual abolition of the trade in slaves. However as stated last week modern Africans seem intent in imposing themselves different variants of the slave trade. How else can one describe the lengths many go to “flee” Africa for Europe, an objective that often involves a dangerous perilous walk through the sahara desert and a very dangerous journey across the Mediterranean sea? Thousands upon thousands including Nigerians have drowned in the Mediterranean. As at October 2016, the UNHCR reported that 3,740 migrants had lost their lives attempting to cross the Mediterranean from Africa into Europe and the said figure was just short of the 3,771 reported for the whole of 2015. Writing on the subject an online commentator stated as follows: