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Ladipo Adamolekun

Getting public service delivery right

Complaints about poor service delivery are louder in the country today than in 2007 when I examined the causes and proposed some remedies (Vanguard, October 24th 2007). Without question, the complaints are louder because the problem has worsened. For example, electricity supply, roads, education standards, and health care are worse today than they were twelve years ago.  In other words, our situation is worse than the memorable line from Baba Sala (late ace Yoruba comedian): ko pass ko fail, ko kuro lojukan – we have not progressed; we have retrogressed.  

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Ladipo Adamolekun

Local governments in Nigeria’s federal democracy

The ongoing debate on local governments in the country could end in a cul de sac if the crucial dimensions of the subject are not explicated and addressed. The trigger for the current debate is the directive of the Nigerian Financial Intelligence Unit (NFIU) that, effective from June 1st, all funds from the Federation Account allocated to the 774 Local Government Areas (LGAs) be credited directly into each LGA’s account. According to reports in newspapers, NFIU’s intervention seeks to put a stop to the widespread practice of State governments hi-jacking the funds allocated to LGAs from the centre through the States Joint Local Government Account (SJLGA) that they control.  And blatant stealing of LGA funds in a few cases have also been reported.

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In Defence of Elite Educational Institutions by Ladipo Adamolekun

Emmanuel Macron who was elected president of France in mid-2017 is the fourth product of France’s elite Ecole Nationale d’Administration (ENA) among the eight to hold the highest public office in the country’s Fifth Republic (from 1958 to date). (His predecessors are Giscard d’Estaing, Jacques Chirac and Francois Hollande). Georges Pompidou, one of the remaining four, also attended another elite institution, the Ecole Normale Supérieure (ENS). 

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Understanding Nigeria’s Weak Party System by Ladipo Adamolekun

After five election cycles (1999, 2003, 2007, 2011 and 2015), Nigeria’s party system has remained fundamentally weak.  Strong evidence of this weakness is provided by the current inchoate state of the two major parties, the All Progressive Congress (APC) that controls the federal government and twenty-three of the thirty-six states and the Peoples Democratic Party (PDP) that ruled at the centre from 1999 to 2015 and controls twelve states.  Besides the All Progressive Grand Alliance (APGA) that controls one state government, all the other 65 registered parties (27 of them were registered in 2017) largely exist only on paper, notwithstanding the requirements for effective national spread prescribed in Part III, D of the 1999 Constitution.

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