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June 15, 2024

Review of Azuh Arinze’s book, ‘Anything & Everything Journalism’

Review of Azuh Arinze’s book, ‘Anything & Everything Journalism’

Pages:430
ISBN:978-978-781-150-4
Publisher: YES International Ventures
Book Reviewer: Uche Nworah, Ph.D.

‘Anything & Everything Journalism’ as the name suggests is truly about anything and everything journalism. The book which has 37 Chapters positions itself as containing the success secrets, styles and strategies of the masters-masters of journalism. In an era of citizen journalism, where it does appear as if everyone with a smart phone, and who can make a post on social media has now become a journalist, it is encouraging and inspiring that the author, Azuh Arinze, has dedicated his time and committed his intellect into studying the journalism masters spanning several eras and genres of journalism for posterity. To the author’s credit, he dedicated the 430-pages book to late Dele Giwa and late Dimgba Igwe. We still remember them fondly and pray that their souls continue to rest in peace, Amen.

In no particular order, the author writes about the styles, secrets and strategies of Olusegun Osoba, Ray Ekpu, Bayo Onanuga, Mike Awoyinfa, Dele Momodu, Femi Adesina, Dimgba Igwe, Simon Kolawole, Azubuike Ishiekwene, Reuben Abati, Musikilu, Mojeed, Olusegun Adeniyi, Louis Odion, Ikechukwu Amaechi, Larry Izamoje, Femi Sowoolu, Bisi Olatilo, Soni Irabor, Adesuwa Onyenokwe, Bimbo Oloyede, Seye Kehinde, Kunle Bakare, Steve Ayorinde, Funke Egbemode, Gbenga Omotoso, Gbenga Adefaye, Eze Anaba, Christopher Isiguzo, Ibim Semenitari, Dotun Oladipo, Dare Babarinsa, Lekan Otufodunrin, Shola Oshunkeye, Lanre Idowu, Femi AkintundeJohnson, Mayor Akinpelu, and Ali M. Ali.

In the book’s introduction, the author asks the questions; Why are some journalists making it and some are not? What are those making it doing that those who are not have refused to or are shying away from doing?

Is there any way out for those who are still not finding their feet in the profession, both financially and otherwise? How also can one distinguish oneself in the profession, without any form of stain? Great posers!

The author goes ahead chapter after chapter to provide some answers to some of these questions. For example, the great Olusegun Osoba counsels journalists in the opening Chapter on legitimate avenues through which a journalist can make money. “You need to have a highly experienced, serious-minded stockbroker, to advice you. Landed property is also good”, Osoba said.

The book is a classic example of how great things can come in big packages. As one reads along, he or she is taken into the personal world of the journalists being profiled by the author. We are taken along their journalism journeys mixed with trials, tribulations and successes.

Who would have thought that celebrity journalist, Dele Momodu, once earned N25 per article when he was writing for The Guardian in 1988,and later earned N9,000 annual salary with Late M.K.O Abiola’s Concord Newspaper Group?

There are also business nuggets contained in the book, such as the one shared by Larry Izamoje on Chapter 15. He disclosed that the best way to retain customers is through providing good service, and establishing regular contact with them.

The taste of the pudding, they say, is in the eating. The book ‘Anything & Everything Journalism’ serves as an encyclopedia of sorts. It is a journalist’s worthy companion, filled with knowledge and wisdom from men and women who have pushed the pen for decades. Not just journalists, every professional wishing to add to their repertoire of knowledge in media, leadership and related fields will find the book very useful. Someone already described the book as ‘Journalists’ Bible’. I agree and highly recommend the book to all. Its easy-to-read style helps the reader to comprehend the various themes discussed by the interview subjects.

Perhaps the author may wish in subsequent editions to also include some successful ‘Millennials’ and ‘Gen Z’ journalists in his study. There are several of them doing great things across the journalism genre. A few names including Linda Ikeji, Rufai Oseni, Omoyele Sowore and Seun Akinbaloye come to mind. Including them will increase the book’s appeal to the younger generation. Also, the author may wish to cast his net wider in future editions and seek out very successful journalists to reflect regional balance, and to achieve wider spread.

‘Anything & Everything Journalism’ is a delightful effort. It is informative, Educative and inspirational. The book deserves a worthy place on our home, office and school library shelves and coffee tables. its contents should occupy our minds as well. The author deserves every applause, encouragement and commendation.