News

June 11, 2024

Nigeria, ECOWAS, FAO move to protect goats, sheep against deadly diseases

Nigeria, ECOWAS, FAO move to protect goats, sheep against deadly diseases

By Gabriel Ewepu

IN a bid to ensure a healthy livestock population, Nigeria and other countries under the Economic Community of West African States, ECOWAS, Food and Agriculture Organisation, FAO, and World Animal Health, WOAH, yesterday, strategised to safeguard goats, sheep and other livestock against deadly diseases called Peste des Petits Ruminants, PPR, in the region.

Minister of State for Agriculture and Food Security, Sen Abdullahi Aliyu, at the opening ceremony of the ‘3rd Meeting of the Peste Des Petits Ruminants, PPR, Global Eradication Programme Regional Roadmap and Blueprint Consultation in the West Africa Region, Hybrid Conference’ in Abuja, said 12.5 million doses of PPR vaccine had been procured to fight and eradicate PPR in Nigeria.

Aliyu noted that PPR also known as sheep and goat plague was a highly contagious viral disease that affects small ruminants, and causes huge economic losses to the farmers and nation at large.

He expressed gratitude to development partners, including FAO and WOAH for their unwavering support and collaborations which have been instrumental in advancing the shared goal of eradicating PPR.

The meeting had participants from member States of ECOWAS and development partners, including the media.

He said: “Your presence here underscores the importance of our collective efforts in tackling this disease and other major livestock diseases devastating the livestock industry in the West African sub-region.

Consequently, the efforts and resources deployed for this conference are worthwhile.

“PPR also known as sheep and goat plague, is a highly contagious viral disease that affects small ruminants, causing significant economic losses and threatening the livelihoods of millions of rural families in West Africa.

“The impact of PPR extends beyond animal health, affecting food security, economic stability, and the overall well-being of our communities and the most vulnerable in the society such as youths and women who depend on rearing of small ruminants (sheep and goats) for a living.”