News

April 14, 2024

Why insecurity subsists in Nigeria – Sydani Group

Positive narratives necessary for tackling insecurity in North West region - CSO

By Emmanuel Elebeke – Abuja

As the nation grapples with various security challenges, ranging from insurgency and terrorism to kidnapping and cybercrime, Sydani Technologies, a member of Sydani group has called for urgent and effective strategies to combat these vices, using model technological tools.

The Head of Sydani Technologies, Noble Ajuonu, who made the call, noted that insecurity remains a pressing concern in Nigeria, presenting a complex and multifaceted challenge that demands innovative solutions.

Ajuonu, who spoke at a media round table organised by Sydani Group in Abuja on the topic: Fighting Ghosts with Gadgets: How Nigeria Can Harness Technology to Combat Insecurity, said, that while the courage and dedication of the security personnel remain indispensable, a powerful ally lies underutilized, which is technology.

From leveraging data analytics and surveillance systems to intercepting critical communications and engaging communities, Ajuonu said developed countries have adopted a myriad of tools to bolster security apparatus, which is obviously lacking in the Nigerian style of fighting insecurity.

‘‘While the courage and dedication of the security personnel remain indispensable, a powerful ally lies underutilized- technology. From leveraging data analytics and surveillance systems to intercepting critical communications and engaging communities, developed countries have adopted a myriad of tools to bolster security apparatus,’’ he said.

He inferred that Nigeria required strategic integration of technology within its security framework to break through in the over-a-decade search for peace.

While X-raying the current security landscape in the country, the Traifoid head of Technologies said the missed opportunities lie in the untapped potential of technology. He stressed that despite some modernization efforts, Nigeria’s security sector largely lags in harnessing readily available tools of technology, and described it as a missed opportunity.

Ajuonu, who decried the lack of a comprehensive identification database in the country over the years said this creates a lacuna where elements not captured in the National database can constitute a public nuisance, perpetuate all kinds of mayhem and remain unidentifiable.

He specifically queried the unutilized surveillance system such as CCTV cameras, which according to him cities across the globe rely on CCTV networks to deter crime and track perpetrators.

While suggesting the use of advanced call interception and analysis tools to neutralize the highly networked kidnapping syndicate in the country, he regretted that Nigeria lacks the necessary infrastructure and expertise to tap into this vital source of intelligence.

‘‘Ransom calls, vital intel exchanged by criminals, these often fly under the radar. Advanced call interception and analysis tools, used successfully in other countries, could provide invaluable insights into criminal networks and operations. However, Nigeria lacks the necessary infrastructure and expertise to tap into this vital source of intelligence.’’

He, however, recommended some immediate solutions that could suffice:

He called on security agencies to prioritize seamless integration of databases like NIN, BVN, and security agency records and to establish clear protocols for data sharing and access, with robust safeguards against misuse. This unified data pool, he said would empower intelligence gathering and targeted operations.

Again, he called for more investment in modern CCTV networks, coupled with intelligent video analytics software. This will include training of personnel in data analysis and interpretation to glean actionable insights from captured footage. According to him, this will lead to identifying and tracking suspicious individuals in real time and preventing crimes before they happen.

He further recommended a legal framework for call interception in criminal investigations, with strict oversight to prevent abuse; bridging the gap between security agencies and local communities by utilizing mobile apps and communication platforms to encourage anonymous reporting of suspicious activity and investing in training and equipping security personnel with tech-enabled tools.

By embracing technology and implementing practical solutions, he is certain that Nigeria can overcome its current security challenges and pave the way for a safer, more secure future for all Nigerians.

For him, technology is not a silver bullet, but it offers a powerful toolkit for combating insecurity in Nigeria, insisting that the time to harness its full potential is now.