.COVID-19

…Announces 1st COVID antibody technology with MPP

By Chioma Obinna

The World Health Organisation, WHO, on Tuesday issued updated guidelines on the management of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children associated with COVID-19, MIS-C.

Meanwhile, WHO s COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) and the Medicines Patent Pool, MPP, has finalised a licensing agreement with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) for a COVID-19 serological antibody technology.

The test effectively checks for the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies developed either in response to a COVID-19 infection or to a vaccine.

However, MIS-C is a rare but serious condition where children with COVID-19 develop inflammation affecting different organs of the body.

According to WHO, children with this condition need specialised care and may need to be admitted to intensive care.
Although MIS-C is a serious condition, with the right medical care, children with the condition recover.

The updated guidelines recommended the use of corticosteroids in hospitalised children under the age of 0-18 years with the condition, in addition to supportive treatment and care.

This is coming on the heels of the availability of three observational studies, pooling data from 885 patients in total.
WHO had first described the condition in May 2020, and provided a preliminary clinical definition.

Overall, children remain at low risk of developing severe or critical COVID-19, but similar to adults, certain underlying conditions make children more susceptible to severe disease.

The most commonly reported of these conditions are obesity, chronic lung disease (including asthma), cardiovascular disease and immune suppression.

WHO, MPP announce 1st global non-exclusive licence for COVID-19 technology

Meanwhile, WHO’s COVID-19 Technology Access Pool (C-TAP) and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP) yesterday finalised a licensing agreement with the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) for a COVID-19 serological antibody technology.

The test effectively checks for the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies developed either in response to a COVID-19 infection or to a vaccine. It represents the first transparent, global, non-exclusive licence for a COVID-19 health tool, and the first test licence signed by MPP and included in the WHO Pool.

The aim of the licence is to facilitate the rapid manufacture and commercialisation of CSIC’s COVID-19 serological test worldwide.

Speaking, President of Costa Rica, Carlos Alvarado Quesada said the licence was a testament to what they can achieve when putting people at the centre of the global and multilateral efforts.

Quesada who is the founding country of C-TAP added that: “It shows that solidarity and equitable access can be achieved and that it is worthwhile continuing to support the principles of transparency, inclusiveness and non-exclusivity that the C-TAP defends. “Costa Rica welcomes the signing of this licence and is convinced, today more than ever, that mechanisms such as C-TAP can help us overcome the current situation while being beneficial for future health crises.”

On the development, WHO Director-General, Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, said: “I highly commend CSIC, a public research institute, for its commitment to solidarity and for offering worldwide access to their technology and know-how.

“This is the kind of open and transparent licence we part in the international initiatives of MPP and WHO, to become an example and a reference for other research organizations in the world.”

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