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Sudan taking control of land on border with Ethiopia – Minister

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Sudan has taken control of most of the land it accuses Ethiopians of encroaching upon near the border between the two countries, the Sudanese Information Minister said on Saturday.

Tensions in the border region have flared since the outbreak of conflict in Ethiopia’s northern Tigray region in early November and the arrival of more than 50,000 mainly Tigrayan refugees in eastern Sudan.

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Disputes have been concentrated on agricultural land in al-Fashqa, which falls within Sudan’s international boundaries but has long been settled by Ethiopian farmers.

There have been armed clashes between Sudanese and Ethiopian forces in recent weeks, with both sides accusing the other of instigating the violence.

The two countries held talks this week in Khartoum over the issue.

“We believe in dialogue to solve any problem,’’ Sudan’s Information Minister, Faisal Salih, told Reuters.

“But our army will do its duty to take back all our land.

“Currently, our army has taken back between 60 per cent and 70 per cent of Sudanese land.’’

Sudanese forces had acted defensively and clashes had subsided in the past two days, Salih said.

“Sudanese intelligence reports confirmed that the organisation, training and arming of the forces that attacked were not militias but regular forces,’’ he added.

Ahead of the talks this week, Ethiopia’s Foreign Minister, Ato Demeke Mekonnen, said that the Sudanese military had carried out attacks beginning on Nov. 9.

“Agricultural products of Ethiopian farmers are looted, their camps are vandalised and they are also hampered from harvesting their own farms.

“A number of civilians have been murdered and wounded,’’ he said.

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed blamed “parties with hidden motives to create hostility and suspicion between peoples’’ for the violence, in a statement issued on Thursday.

Sudanese officials had said that the border was demarcated in the first years of the 20th century and those negotiations were limited to talks over placing additional markers on the land at two kilometres rather than 10 kilometres intervals.

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