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Ethiopian Airlines CEO promises to find out why flight 302 crashed

Ethiopian Airlines will work with investigators in Ethiopia, the U.S. and elsewhere “to figure out what went wrong with flight 302’’, the airline’s CEO, Tewolde Gebremariam, said on Monday.

His pledge follows reports the investigation was under strain because information about the March 10 crash, which killed 157 people, was not being shared with international partners.

Ethiopian Airlines
This handout photograph released from the Twitter account of Ethiopian Airlines on March 10, 2019, shows a man inspecting what is believed to be wreckage at the crash site of an Ethiopia Airlines aircraft near Bishoftu, a town some 60 kilometres southeast of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. – A Nairobi-bound Boeing 737 crashed six minutes after an early-morning takeoff from Addis Ababa on March 10, killing all 149 passengers and eight crew on board, Ethiopian Airlines said as world leaders offered condolences to distraught next-of-kin. People holding passports from 32 countries and the UN were on board the plane which ploughed into a field just 60 kilometres (37 miles) southeast of Addis Ababa, the carrier’s CEO Tewolde GebreMariam told journalists in the capital, lamenting this “very sad and tragic day.” (Photo by HO / TWITTER ACCOUNT OF ETHIOPIAN AIRLINES / AFP) /

Planemaker, Boeing, has come under intense scrutiny since the crash was the second in five months involving its new 737 MAX 8 model.

But Gebremariam said the airline’s relationship with Boeing was sound.

“In spite of the tragedy, Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines will continue to be linked well into the future,’’ he said.

`We pledge to work with Boeing and our colleagues in all airlines to make air travel even safer.’’

Boeing’s 737 MAX fleet has been grounded worldwide since the crash, wiping $28 billion off the company’s market value and throwing doubt over advance orders of the plane, worth more than $500 billion.

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“I fully support this. Until we have answers, putting one more life at risk is too much,’’ Gebremariam said of the grounding.

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