News

September 17, 2014

$9.3m laundering: NCAA to sanction crew over South African arrest

$9.3m laundering: NCAA to sanction crew over South African arrest

CAUGHT—Lanseria Airport, Johannesburg, S-Africa. INSET: The Bombardier Challenger jet. Courtesy: Flightaware.

By Awani Mikairu &  Daniel Eteghe

The Nigerian Civil Aviation Authority, NCAA, yesterday said that the authority would sanction any of the crew member found culpable of the $9.3 million laundered from Nigeria to South Africa.

Disclosing this  to newsmen, Deputy General Manager, Public Affairs of NCAA, Mr. Sam Adurogbeye while reacting to the two Nigerians and one Isreali   arrested in South Africa in connection with money laundering to the tune of $9.3million said   the matter was already under investigation by the government.

CAUGHT—Lanseria Airport, Johannesburg, S-Africa. INSET: The Bombardier Challenger jet.  Courtesy: Flightaware.

CAUGHT—Lanseria Airport, Johannesburg, S-Africa. INSET: The Bombardier Challenger jet. Courtesy: Flightaware.

According to him, if the crew members were found culpable of the offence, they would be adequately sanctioned.
Mr. Adorogbeye said “What I can tell you now as NCAA position is that money laundering is a criminal offence. The matter is being handled at the two government levels. If at the end of investigation and the crew are found culpable, we will sanction them appropriately”

A Nigerian Private Jet, a Bombardier Challenger 600, was seized in South Africa with $9.3 million linked to the President of the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), Paster Ayo Oritsejafor.

Reuters previously claimed that South Africa police had started investigating the two Nigerians and an Israeli contractor, who were on board trying to illegally bring cash into the country, in what might have been part of an arms deal.
According to the three passengers, the money was meant for buying arms for the Nigerian security.

According to Sahara Reporters, information allegedly provided by the Nigerian aviation authorities said one of the jets belonged to Pastor Oritsejafor while the second one was registered in the name of   Felix Idiga, the owner of Jafac Aviation Limited.

It was disclosed by the South African source that Oritsejafor’s jet was released after some high-ranked Nigerian officials insisted that the money was approved by the government for purchase of weapons.

It was further revealed that only the Israeli contractor knew the combination locks to all the cases, which were on board.