Paul Bassey
Do you know there are seven times the number of women in Angola than men? that will be my focus tomorrow. Dont miss your Vanguard copy.     MY MAN OSVALDO ALVARO  Yesterday, I introduced you to this column.

Today, I want to progress by introducing you to a friend I met here. His name is Osvaldo. Osvaldo speaks some good English. He drove me for one day and we had a nice time. Suddenly he was withdrawn from me , yet we still keep in touch.

I want to confess that most of the information on Angola that you will get on this tit bits column should be credited to Osvaldo. That also means that if for what ever reason you do not agree with them, blame Osvaldo. It was he who told me that there are seven times more women in Angola than men.

I asked him why he was telling me this. He said the information was not targeted at me, that this message was meant for Malian players, to make them relax and lose concentration. Remember Mali are their group opponents.  Before I tell you how Osvaldo got his arithmetic , I want to say that the Vice President of the NFF, Amanze Uchegbulam is totally at ease here.

He is a member of the CAF Appeal Commitee. One day we were discussing, and I popped the question. “Don’t you think there are too many injured players in the Nigerian team?”

His reply was quick “ show me a team that has no injured players.Iis it Ghana, Cote Divoire or Egypt?”

He believes that as long as African countries continue to feed from the crumbs that fall off from European tables, so long will they continue to suffer.  Back to Osvaldo. He told me that the civil war took a lot of toll on Angolan men. “…. a lot of us were killed, leaving the women and children.

That is why there are so many women compared to the few men that are available. Poor men, so how do they “escape the threat of the hungry women?” He said he did not understand my question. I said, can he marry more than one wife? He said religion did not permit it.

Yes, Angola has a strong Christian background borne out of their colonial affiliation with the Portuguese.  I will take time out of future articles to tell you my progress in picking some key Portuguese phrases because I was deceived into believing that all the phrases ended in  “O”. There was this day I went to pick up my file. I could not find it in time.

I started wondering whether my name was spelt in Portuguese and foolishly told them to look for Paulo Basseyo. They had a good laugh on me.  tomorrow, I invite you to come into my mini bar.

Relief for the Big Boss

I do not have anything to tell you about the incredible scoreline of the opening ceremony, other than the fact that there were a lot of people who were very happy here for the big boss Stephen Keshi.
If you include Cameroun, why not, you will find that there are eight West African countries here, representing fifty percent of the total number of qualifiers.

This is also carried over to the the World Cup where four West African countries out of five qualified from the qualifiers.

Before the start of the competition therefore, there was a great bonding between the teams here, all of them praying for West Africa, the WAFU region, to continue their dominance of African football.

This camaraderie will take some sustaining in group B in Cabinda where all the teams are from  West  Africa, the withdrawal of Togo notwithstanding.

So, as said earlier, amid the sorrows of the host who lost such an incredible advantage, there were a lot of sighs of relief here by the strong WAFU community.

This is also a good opportunity to remind you that every time Benin has qualified for the nations cup, they have found themselves in the Nigeria Group. In 2004 in Tunisia they lost 1-2 to goals by Garba Lawal and John Utaka, while in 2008, it took goals by John Mikel Obi and yakubu Aiyegbeni to send them packing. This year? Your guess is as good as mine

As the cup progresses, including the shock 3-0 defeat of World Cup qualifiers Algeria by Malawi, there will be more to discuss on the sideline, not forgetting that yesterday i had invited you to take a peep at my mini bar.

Regular travellers will tell you not to touch mini bars. In 1986, i and Muyiwa Daniel were in transit, checked by the airlineinto this “kind “hotel with the fridge well  stocked and we descended on the contents. In the morning, when we were told to pay for mini bar, we begged as we wept.

I was a bit lucky as i opened my bag to bring out some disfigured chocolate bars and nuts. Muyiwa  took some beers in addition and that is how we lost some precious dollars out of ignorance.

My mini bar here will never be touched. In it, you have chocolate, 9 dollars. Tonic water 7 dollars, fruit juice, fanta and canned coca cola 7 dollars, mini whisky 14 dollars, cognac 30 dollars, champagne 300 dollars, Mineral water, 25cl is 6 dollars.

Let me stop here to say that the water i am referring to is the small bottle of water we get for 100 naira back home, that is the one i have been told to come and buy for one thousand naira. Thank you very much.

Today there will be something on Benguela and the Super Eagles.

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