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Never again to the bomb that missed our backyard

In a week when Africa riveted on former President Yahya Jammeh’s tantrums, an event that could have shaken the continent to its core slipped below the radar. Or maybe we didn’t think it was sufficiently important. It emerged early in the week that the British Prime Minister, Theresa May, had knowingly concealed information about a failed missile test when she appeared in Parliament to ask for 40billion pounds to replace the Trident, the UK’s flagship missile defence system.

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Rann: Survivors’ Lamentation

Rann, in Kala Balge Local Government Area, a border settlement with Cameroun Republic, is located east, about 180 kilometres drive from Maiduguri and had witnessed series of deadluly attacks by Boko Haram in the past, before it was liberated by military troops last year. Unfortunately, last week, a Nigerian Air Force fighter jet bombed the cam of IDPs in Rann.

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N5,000 welfare: Buhari and the urgent need for full disclosure

That comment by Stone entered into the notebook which was later to become the manuscript for the VBQ, in 1965, when taking an elective course in Government as an undergraduate. For someone coming from a newly independent African country, where government officials were almost worshiped, it was shocking – especially in a mature democracy. Years later and until now, that revelation by Stone had become the guiding principle of how governments are perceived.

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How restructuring will solve Nigeria’s problems, by Akin Osuntokun

CHIEF Akin Osuntokun was Managing Director of the News Agency of Nigeria and Political Adviser to former President Olusegun Obasanjo. In this interview, he opines that unbundling of the federal government through restructuring will address the problems besieging the country. He also bares his mind on the corruption allegations leveled against the Secretary to the Government of the Federation as well as grazing reserves for herdsmen.

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Payment of N5,000 by FG creates an officially recognised ‘begging class’

On Saturday December 31, 2016, at the residence of the publisher of Vanguard, on a shelf was a copy of Lee Kuan Yew’s global best seller which many people had written and talked about – but few ever read. It was time to read it from page to page in the hope that there might be some insights in it for Nigeria. I was an undergraduate reading Economics in the United States when in August 1965 the majority Malaysians physically threw out the minority Chinese and other races and forced them to form a new country – Singapore. It was a small island state with no natural resources, no large population, nothing to build upon. The vast majority of economist in the US gave the new country no more than six months before collapsing. Its per capital income was far less than that of Nigeria. But, by 2000, it had per capita income of over $13,000 per annum – the third highest of any nation in the world.

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