Thursday April 24th, 2014
Thursday April 24th, 2014
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The new Neanderthals (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:03 am   /   Comments

fani-Igbo

Herd mentality is a necessary concomitant of primitivism. Evidence from psychology indicates that certain personality types are prone or easily susceptible to herd mentality and obsessive attachment to blood and ethnicity, irrespective of their educational and socio-economic background.

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The new Neanderthals (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:17 am   /   Comments

Anambra State Governor, Peter Obi and Lagos State Governor, Babatunde Fashola

The ill-advised action of Lagos state government with respect to the deportation from the state of some destitute of Igbo extraction sometime ago has once again brought to the front seat of public consciousness one of the gaping fault lines in the geopolitical contraption called Nigeria – pernicious ethnicity.

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The difference between running the country and running the country down(2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:40 am   /   Comments

President Goodluck Jonathan (m) juggling the Suckett Football to electricity (a new invention)

As David-West observed, shame is an important human emotion that enables normal human beings “to recoil from evil and bad behaviour, and so tread the path of rectitude and honour.” Shamelessness immunises one psychologically from the pain of evil conduct: the mental disposition allows so-called eminent Nigerians to “wine and dine” with former dictators who almost ran the country aground.

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The difference between running the country and running the country down

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:47 am   /   Comments

cartoon-a

It is very unfortunate that Nigeria continues to be a paradigm case of a richly endowed country in the cesspit of arrested development.

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Philosophy, unceasing quest for the good life (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:47 am   /   Comments

*Gaskiya Senior College, Badia

Therefore, we interpret the idea of love contained in Russell’s definition as containing the elements highlighted by Fromm. However, making allowances for the turbulent and deep emotional attachment characteristic of romantic love, the kind of love intended by Russell involves tolerance, kindness, and feeling of solidarity for fellow human beings. Now, thinkers have hotly debated the problem of knowledge since the earliest beginnings of philosophy.

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Philosophy and unceasing quest for the good life

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:04 am   /   Comments

Arms-n-Ammunition-uche

Philosophy, since its academic canonisation in ancient Greece more than two thousand five hundred years ago, has had a chequered history. Aside from being a relentless quest for wisdom and for the ideal life, philosophy provides the intellectual backbone for momentous events in history.

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Why I am against ASUU’s frequent indefinite strikes (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:08 am   /   Comments

Protest: Polytechnic students protesting against ongoing nationwide strike, on Ikorodu Road, Lagos, yesterday.

It is therefore not surprising that a large percentage of lecturers across the universities appear incapable of examining repercussions of frequent strikes critically and comprehensively; it is as if they are stymied by marginal improvement in salaries after each strike. But as we argued last week, there is no clear evidence that such improvement has translated into enhanced quality of teaching and research

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Why I am against ASUU’s frequent indefinite strikes (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 3:45 am   /   Comments

Asuu cartoon

Once again, another round of insensate indefinite strike by the Academic Staff Union of Universities (ASUU) has paralysed academic activities in federal and state universities nationwide.

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Mr. President, enough of sermonisations please!

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 8:35 am   /   Comments

President Goodluck Jonathan (4th r) leading other fathers in the presentation of a special song during the 2013 Father's Day celebration at the Aso Villa Chapel Abuja on Sunday (16/6/13).

At the official commencement of the national Christian campaign on social transformation tagged: “Be the change you want to see”, put together by the Christian Association of Nigeria (CAN), President Goodluck Jonathan claimed that a lot had gone wrong in the family, schools, churches, and the society generally, and that there is need to bring about transformation.

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The spiritual poverty of Nigeria’s ruling elite

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:01 am   /   Comments

President Goodluck Jonathan (4th r) leading other fathers in the presentation of a special song during the 2013 Father's Day celebration at the Aso Villa Chapel Abuja on Sunday (16/6/13).

One fundamental point that emerges from our discourse on criticism and the growth of democracy in Nigeria is that the ruling class does not really care about the wellbeing of ordinary Nigerians who have been enduring manmade hardships occasioned by mediocre leadership especially since the reestablishment of civilian rule in 1999.

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Criticism and the growth of democracy in Nigeria (3)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:06 am   /   Comments

Corruption1

Corruption in Nigeria is not restricted to the executive branch alone; its destructive tentacles reach all institutions of government. For instance, the legislature is a very important arm of democratic governance saddled with the responsibilities of making good laws for national development and oversight on the executive.

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Criticism and the growth of democracy in Nigeria (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:10 am   /   Comments

PRESIDENT GOODLUCK JONATHAN PRESENTING HIS ADMINISTRATIONS MID-TERM REPORT AT THE 2013 DEMOCRACY DAY CELEBRATION IN ABUJA ON WEDNESDAY (29/5/13). STATE HOUSE PHOTO

Moreover, October 1 is more appropriate for marking Democracy Day, assuming there is need to celebrate democracy, taking into consideration the landmark national events that took place on that day. The most significant dates in Nigeria’s political history are 1914, 1960 and 1967. Of the three, October 1, 1960 is the most relevant to our discussion for two reasons.

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Criticism and the growth of democracy in Nigeria (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:15 am   /   Comments

democracy

Wednesday last week was a public holiday because, according to the federal government, 29the May is “Democracy Day”. The choice of that date and the political significance it has acquired are due to Olusegun Obasanjo whose inauguration as a civilian President took place on May 29, 1999. Since Obasanjo left office in 2007, his successors, namely, Umaru Musa Yar’Adua and Goodluck Jonathan, have retained the public holiday he introduced fourteen years ago.

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Facts and fallacies about marriage (4)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:04 am   /   Comments

Young  couple  relishing  the joy of  having  a baby

Indigenous Nigerian cultures, Christianity, and Islam recommend marriage for everyone. For instance, Christianity teaches that he who finds a wife finds a good thing, and obtains favour from God (assuming that such a being exists). Because The Holy Bible appears to have been written from a fundamentally masculine perspective, there is no mention of a wife finding a good thing if she gets a husband. Islam also encourages marriage, while according to native customs and traditions, an unmarried state for both men and women is an abomination.

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Facts and fallacies about marriage (3)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:10 am   /   Comments

religions

All this indicates that those who look up to religion for guidance on the issue of marriage are liable to make serious mistakes. There is strong evidence from psychology most especially psychoanalysis that obsessive and irrational condemnation of sexual freedom by most founders of religion is due to a combination of superstitious beliefs about sex and thwarting of natural sexual impulse in early life.

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Facts and fallacies about marriage (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:00 am   /   Comments

wedding1

Moreover, religious stipulations on marriage reflect the culture, worldview and experiences of the society from which the religion in question originated. As a result, although there are commonalities across cultures that legitimise generalisation of few particularities of each culture, it is definitely wrong to believe that the nuances of Jewish-Greco-Roman and Arabic cultures in the Holy Bible and Holy Quran must command complete or universal assent from everyone.

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Facts and fallacies about marriage (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:03 am   /   Comments

MR-&-MRS-Marriage-Counsello

It is virtually impossible to know exactly the number of marriages that take place all over the world daily or weekly. What is certain is that an overwhelming majority of men and women still consider it appropriate to formalise their close relationships one way or another through wedlock.

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Femi Aribisala and his errand boy God

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:10 am   /   Comments

In his essay entitled “The God Who Does Not Exist”, published in Sunday Vanguard of March 31st, Pastor Femi Aribisala responded to an article I wrote several months ago in which I declared arguments for the existence of an intelligent divine creator or First Cause invalid. More pointedly, I defended my conviction that God does not exist, and cited briefly the views of some philosophers and scientists to back my claim. I would have ignored Aribisala’s opinionated response, but doing so might create the erroneous impression in the minds of readers that probably he is right or that I find his arguments (insofar as he marshalled any) so compelling that I decided, as the old idiom says, “to let the sleeping dogs lie”.

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Demise of the eagle on the tallest Iroko tree

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:04 am   /   Comments

Chinua Achebe

Having concluded the discourse on “The trouble with Nigerians,” it is time to pay tribute to the recently-departed icon of African literature, Prof. Chinualumogu Albert Achebe. Of course, the heading of that discourse was cloned from the title of Achebe’s pamphlet, The trouble with Nigeria, and a few of his views were used to buttress some major points made therein. Achebe was an accomplished intellectual, Africanist, humanist and teacher.

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The trouble with Nigerians (3)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:13 am   /   Comments

2015-cartoon

This means that the President will make more decisions that, in his own calculations and those of his ardent supporters who are benefiting from the present situation, will bolster his reelectability inspite of how Nigerians will vote in 2015. Now, if the promises President Jonathan made to Nigerians when he was campaigning for election in 2011 are compared with his actual performance, campaigning for a second term would be suspect because he has not delivered on most of those promises.

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The trouble with Nigerians (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:04 am   /   Comments

sanusi1

Therefore, in my opinion, the most important challenge for Jonathan is not ethnic inequality per se in the distribution of key positions, but to justify his choices on the criteria of excellence and performance in spite of ethnicity.

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The trouble with Nigerians (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:06 am   /   Comments

Late Prof Chinua Achebe

In his thought-provoking riposte on Nigeria entitled The Trouble with Nigeria, Prof. Chinua Achebe explained that the principal reason for the horrible state of affairs in the country has nothing to do with geography or climate or the kind of food Nigerians eat. Rather, he says, the trouble with Nigeria is the recurrent blizzard of mediocre and corrupt leadership.

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Remembering Prof. C.S. Momoh

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:10 am   /   Comments

Yesterday, March 16, 2013, was precisely the seventh year that Campbell Shittu Momoh, Professor of African Philosophy, University of Lagos died. To members of his immediate family and those of us he influenced positively one way or another, the psychological wound his sad exit left in our hearts is yet to heal completely. I still remember the discussion I had with him the very night he died, and his demise reminds me of the utter transitoriness of human life here on earth.

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The dwindling population of genuine role models in Nigeria (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:08 am   /   Comments

Nigerian fans cheer their team during the 2013 African Cup of Nations

I know that the temptation to have a big bank account and other trappings of material comfort may be very difficult to resist, especially if such benefits can be had easily just by associating with people that have the necessary financial wherewithal and “right connections.” Yet the Igbo saying that ezigbo aha ka ego (good name is superior to riches) captures a powerful existential insight about life which should guide individual conduct at every level.

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The dwindling population of genuine role models in Nigeria

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:08 am   /   Comments

Chinua Achebe

When one of world’s foremost storytellers, Prof. Chinua Achebe, declined for the second time a national award conferred on him this time around by the current administration of President Goodluck Jonathan, most so-called eminent Nigerians failed to learn the simple but powerful lesson embedded in Achebe’s refusal to “join the bandwagon.”

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Legacies, lessons and the audacity of Joseph Ratzinger’s resignation

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:14 am   /   Comments

Pope Benedict XVI AFP Photo.

When in April 19, 2005, Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger was crowned Pope Benedict XVI after the death of much-beloved Pope John Paul II, observant followers of events in Vatican City knew that the new pontiff had a lot on his plate. To start with, the Pope himself was well aware that he had to work extra hard to match, and if possible surpass, the achievements of his predecessor who was selected despite criticism from some disgruntled highly-placed Italian Catholics opposed to the election of a non-Italian Pope.

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Turning point in Nigeria’s historical evolution: A critical interpretation (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:00 am   /   Comments

President Goodluck Jonathan 

Most Nigerians would agree that although a few of the VIPs that address our man-made problems from time to time are sincere and genuinely concerned, others are just grandstanding to create the impression that they really do care about the country and millions of suffering compatriots.

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Turning point in Nigeria’s historical evolution: A critical interpretation (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:05 am   /   Comments

Last week we argued, among other things, that the present ruling elite who constitute less than one percent of the Nigerian population are unwilling and incapable of moving the country from the precarious position it is at the moment to a better place in the future. Keep in mind that this group, which includes top key players in politics, the military and business, controls over ninety percent of the country’s wealth.

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The growing cynicism about Nigeria’s future (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:05 am   /   Comments

President Goodluck Jonathan 

To give you an idea of the level of official corruption in the country, some estimates suggest that about half a trillion dollars have been stolen from the public treasury by corrupt government officials and unscrupulous business tycoons since 1960. So you can imagine the level of economic development and industrialisation the country would have attained if the money was wisely invested for the benefit of the Nigerian people.

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The growing cynicism about Nigeria’s future (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:07 am   /   Comments

That Nigeria is facing a huge crisis of leadership at the moment is beyond dispute. It is also beyond question that an increasing number of Nigerians are entertaining extreme (some might say weird) ideas about the best way to deal with the problem.

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Repercussions of government-on-holiday (2)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:00 am   /   Comments

*Imo state Governor,  Okorocha

Of what use is free education when the quality of teaching and learning is severely compromised by poor funding and haphazard planning? Instead of free-education-in-the-ocean-of decay, Okorocha should have invested heavily in upgrading educational infrastructure and provision of better welfare packages and on-the-job training for teachers.

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Repercussions of government-on-holiday (1)

  /   in Sunday Perspectives 12:00 am   /   Comments

President Goodluck Jonathan

The New Year,2013, has finally arrived with the usual challenges, hopes and expectations that characterise such occasions. Those of us that traveled to our different villages saw firsthand clear evidence that government is on holidays, so to speak.

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