Of Civil Conduct, High Office

on   /   in Editorial 4:04 am   /   Comments

THE truth lies somewhere. We are all duty bound to find it. The positions of the contending parties may not say it all. What we know so far is that a member of the National Youth Service Corps, NYSC, Thompson Enobong ended up in hospital.

By his account, he was beaten on the orders of the Ekiti State Commissioner for Youth Sports Kayode Olaosebikan, who by his office is also Chairman of the State Board of the NYSC.

Olaosebikan disputes the account. According to him, if he had not intervened, his people would have mobbed Enobong. His benevolence included taking Enobong in his car, to his duty post. He later discovered Enobong was not posted there.

Of late, NYSC members have been victims of pre and post-election violence, rape and assaults. The condemnations that trailed the death of NYSC members on election assignments in 2011 drew empty sympathies.

Enobong was registering voters for the June 21 governorship election in Otun Ekiti in Moba Local Council Area of Ekiti State. The commissioner and his people were at the registration centre. What was his interest in taking Enobong, by his admission, to the centre? Did he not think a ride in his car with an INEC temporary staff had connotations in today’s charged political fields?

Olaosebikan said he found Enobong wanting in the course of the exercise. He said Enobong treated those who wanted to register shabbily. When he wanted to correct him, Enobong shouted at the commissioner and pushed him. What effrontery!

“It was true that the corps member was shouting that a lady – the younger sister to my police orderly – should not register that day at the centre,” Olaosebikan said. A younger sister to the commissioner’s orderly caused this. Not only are public office holders important, their relations assume the supposed importance of their office.

“As we were talking, the boy, who never knew I was a commissioner, just pushed me and my people wanted to mob him, but I was able to persuade them.” Olaosebikan was intervening for the younger sister of his wife’s orderly!

He maintains Enobong was not beaten, as if saying the beating was not enough. Is not knowing “I was a commissioner” an offence, punishable by beating in Ekiti State? Enobong, by the commissioner’s statement, was “a boy”. The commissioner really felt insulted that “a boy” can shout at him.

He expectedly blamed political opponents and sections of the media that hate him for his woes. Should these not have been more reasons for him to be more circumspect about his conduct in public?

We expect the police to investigate the matter thoroughly and punish the guilty party.

 

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